Re-imagine your truth with IN-Q

I am listening to a podcast by Rich Roll, hearing him talk to IN-Q. I am inspired by their discussions about vulnerability, authenticity, honesty, and truth. IN-Q is a modern-day poet of note, rubbing shoulders with Cirque du Soleil, President Obama, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, and others.

Poetry is a beautiful genre that allows people to share their stories and speak their soul. ~ IN-Q

As a teen IN-Q wanted to be a rapper, and his poetry reflects modern day America. It is raw, witty, intelligent, spiritual, gritty, and moving.

Plans for 2014

If there is one thing I learned from 2013 it is that not all plans are successful. Life sometimes takes over and the best laid plans with the right intentions need to be put aside.

But inspired by the ladies from the Up for a Chat podcast, and because I do believe in the power of intention and visualisation, here are some of the things I want to accomplish and/or work towards this year:

12 library podcasts

While I drive to and from work each day I listen to podcasts rather than listen to the radio. I have a few favourites that I download regularly and have mentioned previously on this blog.

driving_to_work

But I was curious to know how many podcasts there are about libraries or by librarians. These are the results of that inquiry; although not the definitive list. My focus is on content about libraries and not particularly books, authors or events. I also focused more on public and academic libraries and disregarded school libraries. These were all still active at the date of this blog post. My rating system judged the podcast on: relevance; content; sound quality; host performance; currency; and enjoyment factor. The results reflect an entirely personal opinion.

  1. Circulating Ideas by Steve Thomas (USA) ☺☺☺☺☺
  2. EdReach-LiTTech Show by EdReachUs (USA) ☺☺☺
  3. Free Library of Philadelphia by Free Library of Philadelphia (USA) ☺☺☺☺☺
  4. Infopeople by infotweets (USA) ☺☺
  5. Jisc Podcast by Jisc (UK) ☺☺☺
  6. Librarian on the edge by Terry Ballard (USA) ☺
  7. Library Chat by Corin Haines (NZ) ☺☺☺☺☺
  8. Nerdy Librarians by Michael and Mindy Perry (USA) ☺
  9. T is for training by baldgeekinmd (USA) ☺☺
  10. The Library Channel by ASU Libraries (USA) ☺☺☺☺
  11. TWIL (This Week in Libraries) by Eric and Jaap (Netherlands) ☺☺☺☺☺☺
  12. Whatever Mathers by Amy Mather (USA) ☺☺☺☺

You can find these podcasts and many more via the iTunes store.

I am currently reading Wool by Hugh Howey. I have just finished watching Series 2 of Game of Thrones on DVD. I am listening to The Wellness Guys podcast.

On your soapbox

Have you got a message that you are just dying for the world to know, get, embrace, and love? Do you think it is original, clever, valuable, and its time is NOW? Is your voice, your expression, your style, the best way for this incredible message to be heard? Have you got a box to stand on, a platform, a medium, from which to deliver this amazing message?

You think? Sure? Why not? May as well have a go hey? Go for it!

After-all blogging is so 2000’s. “Everyone” has a blog now. So to stand above the crowd you have to find a way to be noticed. And setting up your own podcast seems to be a great way to do this. Just think you can talk and talk to your heart’s content saying all you need to say without interruptions.

So what have you got to say? Got an idea? A theme? A revelation? A message? A set of instructions to share?

And what’s your motivation? Fame? Fortune? Freedom? Notoriety?

And what’s your format? Interviewing others? Off the cuff? Following a framework or schedule of planned passages?

Will you use advertising? Employ Brand “You”? Offer sincerity and appreciation? Will you repeat your message? What about using music breaks? Will you tell stories in order to catch the listener’s attention?

Podcasts are cropping up like mould in a damp bathroom. Some are more successful than others. Some are much more listenable than most.

There are the DIY models such as Podcast Answer Man, This Is Your Life, Circulating Ideas, Man vs Debt, and others.

There are those that spring from reputable sources such as The Midday Interview with Margaret Throsby, TED Talks, Hamish and Andy, and more, and more.

And there are many more in between and this field is growing fast.

In recent times I have had the privilege to attend quite a few sessions where people get up in front of an audience to speak on a topic. Sometimes there is a theme, sometimes not. It really is a special experience and there is no doubt that the personal live experience does stand out and above what the average podcast can deliver.

Recently I attended the LGPro Women in Local Government development forum in Melbourne.

Of particular note was the opening talk given by Rachael Robertson who led the 58th Australian Antarctic Research Expedition to Davis Station. Her message, her story, and her delivery were spellbinding.

The closing speaker was Emma Gee who is an Occupational Therapist and a stroke survivor. Facing far more obstacles and challenges than the average speaker, her presentation was funny, clever, sad, practical and inspirational. Emma’s message is “that it is not what happens to you that matters, it is how you choose to deal with it.” Her clever use of video segments in her presentation that depicted some of life’s challenges from her perspective was poignant.

So have you got a message? You never know, yours might just be the one that captures the imagination of the masses and brings you fame, fortune and freedom.

Mipod

I know. I know. I’m late into the ipod market. I just bought my first one – a 32gb ipod touch. I didn’t particularly want one nor need one, even though I am an avid music lover. The CD players in my car and home have always fulfilled my needs.

Having moved to a country area I discover that my favourite radio program is unattainable. Downloading the podcasts of the program is possible, so I thought about buying an mp3 player for this purpose. The difference in price was a determining factor, as well as my reluctance to buy into the proprietary nature of Apple products, and this resulted in the purchase of a generic brand mp3 player. I was suspicious when seeing on the device interface “artists” spelled with an extra “i” – “aritists”. If I had been able to see this error before purchase I definitely would not have bought it. Work mates told me that if I didn’t buy an ipod I would wish I had. They were right.

I pushed ahead though and downloaded the mp3 files of the podcasts from the program, then loaded them onto the mp3 player, only to find that I could not hear the program through my ear-phones as I drove along the highway in my car. This made me realise I would need to buy an ipod after all. So I did. Then I bought the necessary accessories: protective jacket, charger, and car FM transmitter.

The first “sync” between my pc and ipod transferred just under 1000 separate mp3 tracks. Some of these were the downloaded radio programs, some were of a lecture series from the State Library of Victoria, and others were French language lessons. The majority were of music tracks from my previously bought CD’s.

To my delight I found that I could subscribe to my favourite programs via RSS feeds through itunes, and these would be updated automatically from website to pc to ipod without me having to do anything after the initial addition of the subscription. This is how today’s technology should work – seamlessly and easily. And when I have viewed or listened to the program on my ipod it is automatically removed when I connect again to itunes. I can now listen, without ear-phones, to my favourite programs and music playlists whilst driving the long trip to work every day. I can forego the mindless drivel and advertisements on the local radio broadcasts, and improve and broaden my mind by learning interesting things told by the clever people interviewed by Margaret Throsby.

I also subscribe to TED talks and can load them onto my ipod and watch them at my leisure, although I still mainly do this on my pc, but I get notifications of the latest talks as they are available, so don’t have to go searching, then I can pick and choose the ones that interest me.

I have only touched the tip of the iceberg and haven’t even begun to search for apps that might be of interest to me. I have created playlists from my music collection and can play these loud in our house with an mp3 dock and speakers. I love this ability to tailor my listening consumption to suit my own tastes and circumstances.

The handling and management of ebooks is another area that interests me personally and professionally and I will investigate this further. I did download some ebooks using audible.com but found a silly glitch with my pc and itunes because our laptop has an administrator and two users. I access itunes and my ipod through my user, audible loads via the administrator and itunes and audible won’t allow the access from one to the other, even though they are all me: one of those problems caused by the proprietary nature of Apple and Microsoft.